09.03.2020

Lilian


The Lilian wordmark and menu design was created by Lotte Design – see more here

Photography by Sarah Grace

Sitting in this establishment, two good Italian proseccos in, stealing the last bite of burrata from the shared plate as you eye-up what’s for mains, you’ll probably have forgotten you’re not in some family-run osteria, on some little cobblestoned laneway, somewhere in Tuscany. You’re in Lilian – Auckland’s ‘newest oldest’ eating establishment, in the neighbourhood of Grey Lynn.

Lilian is the creation of Honey Bones‘ (we featured that space on The New when it opened, here) owners, Hugo Baird, Willy Gresson and Otis Gardner Schapiro. Lilian was actually the name of Otis’ grandmother, and the concept was for a space that would be evocative of her imagined home and hospitality – comfortable and comforting, almost humble in its simplicity.

There’s a very authentic sense of heritage here, as if Lilian’s been a part of the fabric of Grey Lynn for decades. They could have made the traditional osteria concept twee, but everything feels substantive and storied. The deep-toned, aged and detailed timber, the textured walls, the extra-thick stone and marble countertops, the genuine-vintage lighting, the handcrafted tiles… even the leather is worn-in. Nothing in the space feels new. It’s the work of Interior Architects Ctrl Space, in collaboration with co-owner Hugo. Together, they’ve created a space that feels as though it’ll be around for a while.

One of my favourite details is the pass – it could have been considered by the designers as a purely functional space, but they’ve made it a feature that adds to this rich visual story… I love the detailed European windowsill with the sash windows and pebbled glass.

Can we also just talk about how beautifully photographer Sarah Grace has captured this space? She’s saying more with light and shadow than my words ever could. For more atmospheric imagery, check out Sarah’s website, and follow her on Instagram @sarahgracephoto.

See more of Ctrl Space’s portfolio of design here, or follow @ctrl.space. Check out the Lilian menu and wine list here, or follow @lilian.akl

05.02.2020

Solid Foundation



Photography by Nicholas John Wilkins

Unpopular opinion: I’m not into Yoga.  I’m not patient enough for it… which is precisely why I probably need it, right? Well, if I were in Auckland, I’d be encouraged to give it another go at this beautifully-designed new studio, Basecamp Power Yoga.

Studio 11:11 (Melbourne-based, but co-helmed by New Zealand architect and interior designer Annabel Smart) transformed the shell of an old Grey Lynn warehouse – nicknamed the scrapyard – elevating it to the very warm, meditative space you see here. I love how they’ve kept the rawness of the original architecture, celebrating the perfectly imperfect surfaces and rough textures, playing up the industrial feel with hot-rolled steel features (like that sculptural clothing rack by NZ maker SaintLeo, anchored by a chunk of basalt rock), and layering washed timber, atmospheric lighting and natural textiles.

Kudos, Studio 11:11, you have managed to create an environment of softness and strength both; perfect for a brand that values both power and pliability.

23.01.2020

Making Space: Homestyle 2020


The first Homestyle issue of the new year is here, so get ye to the magazine shoppe tout suite. (Also, PSA for our Australian friends – Homestyle is now available in your neck of the woods! Send the Homestyle team a DM on Insta with your postcode, and they’ll let you know your nearest newsagent).

The cover girl this issue is this home above and below – a white-wood-and-concrete new build, perched high on a Te Arai hill.  Come for the incredibly beautiful interiors and architecture, stay for the story of how the family left Auckland for a new lifestyle in the countryside, and how they’re managing to balance lifestyle with work (love a good City Quitter story).

Substantial, yet soft –  interior designer (and owner) Melanie Sax and architectural designer Fraser Horton make quite the duo.

Photography by Duncan Innes for Homestyle

The master bedroom is divided by a part wall, behind which sits this ensuite of your dreams (see much more inside the magazine).

Along with this inspiring home, you’ll find five other house tours in this issue (six if you count the contemporary refurbed bus!) including this wee cottage below, the home sweet home of NZ architect Maria Hosking and her builder husband. I loved this feature – the home is packed with great ideas, and examples of what can be done in a small space with both an open plan and an open mind.

Gorgeous kitchen layout and materiality.

Photography by Simon Wilson for Homestyle

Styling Juliette Wanty; Photography by Wendy Fenwick

Unsurprisingly, Homestyle Art Director Juliette Wanty has me deceased again, with a styled feature (sneak peek above) that offers sophisticated ways to get sorted for the new year, plus we get a look at the unique workspaces of several NZ creatives, and editor Alice Lines takes us along on her recent artisan tour of Japan!

Grab your scissors and giant glue stick, and get ready to want to cut everything out to stick on your vision board.

 

SUNDAY-online-homeware-store

19.11.2019

Homestyle on Holiday


They saved the best for last: this final Homestyle issue of the year is 2019’s best – which is sayin’ something. (and not just because there’s a 4-page feature on my new book, Our Spaces, in it).

Photography Sean Fennessy 

The theme for this issue is homes that take you on holiday, and the cover girl is this clifftop beachside beauty in Australia’s Portsea, designed by Studio Esteta.  I’m loving seeing blues – from powdery to punchy – coming through in interior design at the moment, especially balanced with fresh white and warm timber. There’s 14 pages of images from this inspiring, relaxed residence in the issue – definitely a highlight.

Photography Duncan Innes

There’s five excellent New Zealand home tours – my fave was this reno of a laid back 50’s holiday bach – by its owner, NZ interior designer Joanna Cowie. (let’s be friends, Jo). Along with the half a dozen home tours, this issue also takes us on virtual vacay to an amazing boutique design hotel on the island of Menorca, Spain, visits the beautiful home of a young Kiwi family doing humanitarian work in Uganda, and introduces us to the work (and creative workspaces) of NZ artists Sophie Rowley and Grace Bader.

Oh, and did I mention there’s a feature on my coffee table book – Our Spaces – in this issue? Can’t remember if I mentioned it. Better mention it again, just to be certain. It’s an interview with yours truly. And some of Homestyle’s favourite interior imagery from the book. It’s like 4 pages in this issue. No big deal. But check it out though.

 

(P.S Penpals: One entire year of issues is only $51, delivered.
Play Santa to yourself and get a subscription for Christmas.)

 

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