29.06.2019

Spaces


I suspected the renovation of Australian Interior Designer Kate Walker’s own home would be bangin’, and it does. not. disappoint. Her amazing laundry packs so much gutsy detail into a small space, while still retaining a light, airy feel.
As with other Kate Walker projects, the hard finishings are the real heroes – that chunky fireclay sink, marble drip, English Bronze tapware, shiplap, hand-chiselled herringbone tiles… Favourite part? That amazing Dutch door in bold black!

Thought you might like to also see this view. Those cupboards? They’re drying cupboards, a big trend in laundry design at the moment. No more clothes racks scattered around the house, no more coming home to wet clothes on the line because it rained while you were out. O,hai form and function.

The aesthetic throughout is best described as modern farmhouse, and Kate’s brought the palette of the Australian landscape inside with shades of sage green, grey and terracotta.

Kate’s own private ensuite is like*Angels singing*. I love the feminine, light touch of the fabric in this space, especially against the weight and warmth of the terracotta tiles.

Photography by Armelle Habib

This shower! That ‘plaid’ tiling on the floor (Kate couldn’t find plaid tile, so instead, made her own from 3 different colours of encaustic tiles), the english bronze tapware, those sage green slim subway tiles laid vertically…

If these spaces have you inspired, go check out the Kate Walker Design blog to see loads more of Kate’s home, and follow Kate on Instagram (she’s also a single mum and a complete superwoman)


Love the black floorboards and other black accents against the super-faded Turkish rug and white linen.

Of course I can’t let a Spaces go by without at least one teeny Scandinavian apartment.

My favourite kitchen designers Nordiska Kok have done it again with this dreamy shaker kitchen. If we’re playing the ‘What Would You Change’ game,  I’d switch ip the cabinet handles (they’re perfectly farmhouse-style, but I’d opt for something a little more modern and linear, to balance out the rusticity).

Vart platsbyggda skandinaviska shakerkok i gratt. Massiv bankskiva i ek och stor kokso i second hand, mattanpassat for Ellen Dixdotter i hennes skanelanga på Osterlen. Vitrinskap med antikglas och trainsida, porslinsho och porlinsknoppar skapar detta dromkok.

Definitely doing grey walls in our next place. What Would I Change Here? Lighter, real linen curtains that puddle on the floor.

Loves a layered rug situation and a salon hang.

 

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Planning a room reno ? Get your pick of flooring samples sent to your door, with Flooring Xtra’s Sample Box

04.04.2019

Abroad: New Zealand Architect Briar Hickling


 


Watch this short video please
(Created by Postcard Productions for Herschel Supply Co.)

 

You look at both the quantity and quality of projects Briar Hickling has worked on… and then you see she’s still just in her 30’s. Barely hitting her stride. Can you imagine her body of work in another decade?

After graduating at Massey, Briar cut her teeth working for one of New Zealand’s leading hospitality designers, Allistar Cox. Then, in 2009, she moved to Shanghai, to a Senior Associate position at Neri & Hu, one of China’s most world-renowned architectural practices. There, she worked on world-class hospitality projects in Asia, Australia and the UK, including restaurants for internationally acclaimed chefs, and hotel projects such as Westin Hotel Xi’an, The Waterhouse in Shanghai, and the Alila in Kuala Lumpur. It was at Neri & Hu she met her work wife. fellow design wunderkind, Alex Mok. After collaborating on a number of big projects together, Briar and Alex founded their own practise, Linehouse.

In Briar’s own words: …I saw China as an opportunity to start my own practice… to create unique spatial concepts with a contextual narrative. In some ways the design process is more open in Asia, the construction process is faster and there is more room for flexibility. If you can harness this somewhat chaotic process, the result can be very rewarding. This is how I have managed to build an extensive portfolio of work which also came down to hard work and initiative. Now based between Hong Kong and New Zealand, the last 10 years have allowed me to establish a network of local craftsman, creating bespoke designs and allowing for an inventive use of materials to create something new and unexpected.”

That was 2014. It’s been a prodigious 5 years, conceiving and realising 30 (Yes, three-zero – in five years!) of the most incredible, storied, exquisitely-detailed environments.

Above is just one of their most recent projects – John Anthony, an East-meets-West Dim Sum eatery on Hong Kong Island. Named after historical figure John Anthony, the first Chinese man to be naturalised as a British citizen in 1805, and the ‘father’ of London’s original Chinatown. Briar and Alex’s design draws on the story of John Anthony’s life, exploring a fusion of colonial architecture with eastern detailing, to create a British Tea Hall turned Chinese Canteen.

Linehouse have employed the materials John Anthony would have encountered on his journey from his homeland to London’s docklands: hand-glazed tiles, natural and racked renders, terracotta, hand-dyed fabrics and handwoven wickers, hammered copper lights. A celebration of sustainability and traditional craft is communicated everywhere you look. The detail is amazing.

The main dining hall, with its vaulted ceiling, is an interpretation of the storehouses of London’s docklands.

The floors are tiled with reclaimed terracotta from old Chinese village houses

The aesthetic plays on the retro nostalgia of East-London Chinese canteens

The private dining rooms are lined in hand-painted tiles, featuring large scale illustrations of commodities traded between the British and Chinese in the 18th century such as medicinal poppies and exotic animals. 

Briar’s very latest project, Tingtai Teahouse, is a series of huge elevated boxes inside a vast old factory. These suspended spaces-within-a-space act as individual private teahouses, all sleek glass, brushed stainless steel and contemporary minimalism, alongside the patina of the original concrete columns and brick walls of the former factory.  See photos of this incredible project here. (Actually, pop the jug on and set aside a half hour to tour all their projects – so inspiring)

It won’t be long before Briar and Alex will stretch those impressive wings to other progressive pockets of the globe. They’ve recently opened an office back on Briar’s home turf – I’m hoping that means there’s a New Zealand project on the way….

08.03.2019

New Things


Aussie homeware brand Sage x Clare have recently launched their newest collection, Terra, and it’s more of the same 70’s-feel-good feels and colour folk party. Wishlisted piece: this rainbow bath mat.
See the whole Terra collection here.

Spotted and loved the work of Turkish potter Zehra Balci (@maitoinenhome) – especially her latte-glass style ceramic coffee cups. Buy online here.

 A new outpost for Melbourne Gelateria Piccolina. The St.Kilda space was designed again by Hecker Guthrie.

Elton side table by new #WCE Sarah Ellison

These incredible images are actually huge photographic prints by Australian photographer Stuart Cantor. They come in various XXL sizes (up to almost 2 metres wide!) framed or unframed. I’d pick a print from Stuart’s newest Amalfi Forever series – capturing the iconic beach clubs of the Amalfi Coast – for my wall, but his Venice series is also incredible.

 
 

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31.08.2018

New Things


From the holy. freakin. incredible. files – the new Paramount House Hotel in Sydney. An old Paramount Pictures building (and film storage warehouse), transformed into a small design-lead hotel. The visionary founders (who are also behind some of Sydney’s best cafes) tasked Breathe Architecture with turning the old industrial space into 29 guest suites.

The hotel lobby – a light-filled atrium – was once a film storage vault (Spot the tap there? That’s for your welcome drink)


Real linen by Cultiver for an at-home feel

Sofas by Jardan

A beautiful mix of materials: Japanese-style timber baths alongside terrazzo tiles, brass tapware,
thick linen shower curtains and steel-framed glass walls. 

The Loft rooms have their bedroom on a mezzanine level

Love the hotel robes (the pink type on the back says HOUSE) . Toiletries are by Aesop.

As if the interior design weren’t enough to convince you to stay, there’s a green grocer, coffee house, arthouse cinema and more on site, incense available at the front desk, mini bars stocked with Australian-made Negroni cocktails and local cheeses, and if you don’t want to be disturbed, you put a sign on your door that states: “This Is How We Chill From ’93 Till…” Um, it’s like they made this place for meBook a stay at Paramount House Hotel here, and definitely follow the hotel on Insta. On my travel wishlist now for sure.

I want one of these Steele canvas baskets from Mur.

Lenny cafe in Melbourne, designed by Golden (interior design duo Kylie Dorotic and Alicia McKimm).
Extra appreciation for the hand-painted artwork that runs down the length of the space.

Um ok, I lOvEeeee this little step stool from Murmull

Ro Skin store and treatment rooms – places like this can take all my money. That wall shelving system with its rattan panels is especially beautiful.

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