04.05.2018

Sure to Rise


It’s unlikely you’d just stumble across this spot in Wellington – you’d have to be told by someone to go there. They’ll say: go right down Left Bank Lane (no, not far enough, keep going… right down to the somewhat derelict end of the arcade) and look for the big orange S.  You’ve just struck gold. This is Starta Bread Kitchen – a beautifully-designed space, serving truly world-class breads and pastries.

Starta is the fresh-out-the-oven (refusing to say kitchen, because #RKelly) business baby of Catherine Adams, a Wellington-trained pastry chef who perfected her art in Sydney’s best restaurants, before returning home a few short years ago to start Wellington Sourdough. She supplies her bread (including her classic sourdough which has just three ingredients – local Wellington flour, Marlborough rock salt, and water from an artisanal spring in Petone) to Welly city’s best cafes and eateries. This year, she opened the doors to Starta – out back, the premises of Wellington Sourdough’s commercial kitchen and, out front, the most stunning little bread shop and bakery.

The fit-out is courtesy of the young design team at Proffer. The star of the space is the hopper room, featuring 8 massive grain holders that were sourced from Turkey (see pics above). Polished concrete floors and rough, raw concrete walls celebrate the traditional and industrial, while walls clad in fine vertical panels of American Cedar bring warmth and texture. The dimly-lit space has a sophistication you would never guess from your walk down that laneway – Spanish floor tiles and a white marble counter are just a couple of the elegant accents. When you eat Wellington Sourdough, you’re enjoying something that’s completely traditional and also leading-edge, and I think this interior champions both concepts beautifully.

While most of us are still asleep, Catherine is putting out the daily bread (and pastries)

The grain hopper wall – the hero of this stunning interior fit-out 

Spanish floor tiles alongside original industrial flooring

 American Cedar details mirror the circles and half circles that are a hallmark
of Wellington Sourdough’s brand identity

 

Imagery by Wellington freelance photographer Meg Wyper,
who actually sent me some Wellington Sourdough on an overnight courier. True friend.

 
 

25.10.2017

Meet Pepa


Within the historic Christchurch Arts Centre…

Inside a room in the Gothic Revival Boys’ High Building (built in 1881)…

Behind this door (This door though! Beautiful!)…

You’ll find the best little stationery boutique you ever did see.
This is Pepa.

Product styling by Bonny Beattie

Ami Muir, Pepa founder and amazing person.

Photography all by Bonny Beattie, with thanks

SO excited about today’s feature! Allow me to introduce Pepa – an all-things-stationery store that’s just opened in Christchurch. Pepa is the boutique baby of Ami Muir (you might know Ami from her Great NZ Wrapping Paper book we’ve featured before) – 35 year old mum, ex-advertising agency career woman, and lifetime stationery addict. (We’re sisters from another mister, Ami.)

Through Pepa (Maori for paper), Ami is bringing some of the world’s best, cult-classic and contemporary brands to New Zealand. And what’s more, these are brands you can’t get anywhere else in New Zealand. As an unashamed papyrophiliac (it’s been 3 days since my last stationery purchase), I gotta say Ami’s curation is off-the-charts good. I added over 20 things to my Cart. Husbo, please get my Christmas gift from Pepa. Ami also promises that Pepa will be an evolving mix of cool new stuff – the world of stationery is constantly moving with aesthetic trends, and Ami has more ideas than she has store space.

Let’s hear a little from Ami, in her own words: “I’ve always had a really unhealthy love for stationery and all things paper, that coupled with my love for old fashioned pen and paper culminated in a need to open something I had always searched for in NZ, a stationery store.” The underlying values of Pepa are even more personal than this for Ami: “As a child I used to love checking the mailbox every single day, and luckily for me there would often be a letter from one of my two nanas. I know how much receiving an unexpected letter can change someone’s day, and if I can be a little bit responsible for making people smile as they open the mailbox I will be a very happy person. I also worry that the digital age is completely overcoming us, and the kids of today are missing out on the little things – like writing or receiving a letter.”

While having her very own little stationery shoppe had long been a dream, it wasn’t until Ami spotted this space – the perfect mix of nostalgia and modernity – that she knew she had to do whatever it took to make her dream happen. Pepa is located in one room within the Boy’s High building, part of the historic Christchurch Arts Centre (a collection of Category 1 heritage buildings). The Christchurch Arts Centre is progressively re-opening after extensive post-earthquake restoration, and the Boy’s High building started welcoming new businesses a couple of months ago. Side note: I really need to get myself down to Christchurch for a weekend – so many exciting new openings there recently.

Pepa’s brand (aesthetically a nod to famous English poster artist Tom Eckersley, and illustrators of his kind like Anna Kovacses) was designed by Rikki Burns, and Ami’s also collaborated with one of my fave NZ creatives, Bonny Beattie, for interior styling of the store, product styling and photography.

Get yo’ stapler-appreciating friends and make a day of it, or if you’re too far from the garden city, Pepa has a full, super-good-looking online store.

 

Pepa Stationery

Boys’ High building, The Arts Centre, 28 Worcester Blvd, Christchurch.
Open 10-5, seven days a week

Pepa online store   /   Pepa instagram   /   Pepa Facebook

13.09.2017

Caffeine Chemistry


 

This Brutalist babe is the newest cafe from NZ coffee roasters eighthirty.
(If you haven’t seen it yet – their High St cafe is one of our most popular blog features – see that here).

Located in the iconic 1920’s Tasman Building (Anzac Ave, Auckland), the space is actually eighthirty’s wholesale production facility. They just happen to also be open cafe hours, so you and I can grab a brew and a bite. It’s been designed with the same meticulous attention to craft and care that eighthirty take with their coffee, and is a collaboration between architect Dominic Glamuzina and eighthirty founder Glenn Bell, who set out to create a modern coffee laboratory.

The state-of-the-art tech here includes a stainless steel Loring roaster (there’s only one other in New Zealand) that lets eighthirty triple their output, with impeccable consistency of roast. There’s also precision coffee scales, a reverse osmosis water filter which guarantees the proper water mineral content for your coffee, and New Zealand’s very first Modbar pour-over system – an intelligent tap that pours water at the perfect temp and perfect speed for Chemex and V60 brews. Cool Science.

Details you would have spotted but that I still want to mention: white La Marzoccos with matching matte white milk jugs (I want this at home!), that hulking faceted concrete counter, black timber stools designed by Ben Glass, and steel wire furniture custom built by eighthirty engineer and co-owner Tim Solomon.

Don’t ask for a trim bowl latte here. (Not that you would.)

 

 

22.06.2017

Hugo’s Bistro


Hello, Lee Broom crescent lights

Stunning blush pink mottled walls – love these muted hues

These chairs. These may just be the greatest chairs of all time.
They are the W Chair by Fabrizio Gallinaro for Billiani.

Interior Photography by Anna Kidman.

 

The New Zealand hospitality scene continues to outdo itself. I’ve said this before, but watch out Melbourne, we’re coming for you.

So excited today to introduce you to Hugo’s Bistro – from the team that served us the very impressive Odettes Eatery. While Odettes is light and open, Hugo’s has a more intimate, sophisticated edge. Less a sister restaurant than a debonair older brother restaurant, you might say. He’s refined, yet relaxed – the furniture, lighting and materials are sleek and high-end, but the overall feel stays inviting and warm, thanks to soft shapes (the sort of person who notices these things – like you – will notice arches and circular forms used throughout), and plenty of yummy texture and tactility. Think forest green corduroy banquette seats, blush pink walls, locally-handmade ceramics, dappled light, and brass touches. The impressive interior is the work of Clare van den Berg, co-owner of both Hugo’s and Odettes (with husband Joost).

The polished but unpretentious brand identity was created by Hannah Souter (of Hannah Design Studio), who also worked with Clare on Odettes Eatery. Hannah chose the elongated typeface of the logo to mirror the long, narrow shape of the bistro, but curved all edges as a nod to the curvilinear form of the furniture and space. Hugo’s menu design calls subtly back to sibling Odettes – folding out to the height of an A3 but with a long and slender shape to recall the Hugo’s space. A brand palette of forest green, blush, brass and grey reflects the lush colours of the bistro’s interior. Sexy as hell.

Fiend over the menu at the Hugo’s Bistro website

 

Project Credits

Interior Design – Clare van den Berg 
Graphic Design – Hannah Design Studio (Instagram @hannah_design_studio)
Interior Photography – Anna Kidman (@annakidmancommercial)
Design Collateral Photos – Shadowlands (@shadowlandsnz)

 

online-homeware-design-store-nz

© The New

theme