07.02.2019

Sunna Studios


Sunna Studios is a line of organic, ethical, all-natural clothing for little ones, created by twin sisters Brooke and Elise Ratima. The twins design each garment themselves, then have them ethically made using New Zealand merino and GOTS Certified organic cotton. Once sewn, the pieces come back to their rural north auckland home, where they hand dye each small garment in their backyard studio. They use natural dyes extracted from plants – from avocado stones, to leaves from local trees, to roots, bark and flowers from their garden, to sustainable natural powders sourced online. With every new dye bath, Brooke and Elise create a unique garment, made special for a little someone. It’s a small, slow operation, producing limited numbers of truly beautiful little basics.

The Sunna aesthetic is based on thoughtful simplicity, with an emphasis on texture and earthy tones. The pieces are designed to be well-worn and well-loved basics, that can mix and match seamlessly into the wardrobe – helping to encourage better fashion habits.

Remember when natural, consciously-made products were hiiiideous looking? But now, we get to choose things that are not only design-led and beautiful to look at, but are also good for us, and good for the planet. Not only that, but we get to support other people with our choices – their dreams, their values and their families (like local women and mums, building their own businesses). What a time to be alive, right?

Sunna Studios Collection 01 is online now, with Collection 02 coming very soon.

Sunna Studios online store  /  Instagram

 

22.01.2019

Salad Days


Photography Saskia Wilson; Styling Alicia Scibberas

 

Before we get started here, can we take a moment to appreciate the name Salad Days for a ceramic brand? Best name! It gives me such happy, nostalgic vibes.

Lucy Coote’s story in ceramics started 6 years ago. She’d studied fashion and business, and then got a ‘real job’ in an office, but found herself needing a creative outlet, so signed up for a pottery night class. She fell in love with it, joined a potter’s association, and after a couple of years spending most of her spare time in the studio, she started selling pieces to friends and family… then to a few stockists… and then through her own online store. By this time, she was working in film production, but nights and weekends weren’t enough to keep up with demand. She had to choose: grow her career in the film industry, or make ceramics full-time? When she asked herself which she couldn’t live without, it ended up being an easy decision.

She left her job and committed to Salad Days, but soon after discovered she was pregnant (with twin girls! – Margaux and Daisy who are now 19 months old). To say Lucy’s not really had oodles of time to focus on her ceramics would be an understatement. The juggle is real. But – thankfully for those of us who want to buy ALL her things – Lucy and husband Mark have just moved home to Wellington. Here at home, they have the family support to allow Lucy to work more flexibly, and they can actually achieve their dream of buying a home – something with a studio, or potential for one. While they house-hunt, Lucy’s working from fellow pottery pal Wundaire’s studio.

(Why do I tell you all this stuff? Because The New’s not just about aesthetically beautiful things. Yeah, yeah, it mainly is, but not just. It’s also about the real people behind these aesthetically beautiful things. And it’s also about pursuing your creative passions, and what it takes to do that.)

Salad Days pieces are timelessly simple and refined. Lucy designs beautiful silhouettes and her own glazes for a contemporary yet classic look, but as she’s creating, she’s thinking about function just as much as form. She imagines what you’ll use your bowl/mug/jug for… what would be the best size and shape for that… what shaped handle would make it feel best. She’s making something to be loved for a lifetime, for all your Salad Days. I’ll take one of everything please.

Salad Days Website

Salad Days Instagram (ceramics and cute bebs!)

 

17.10.2018

For Sun Chasers


Designer Zoe Horner has spent the last few years travelling overseas, visiting far-flung sun traps, and working as a textile and graphic designer along the way. In one of her most recent roles as a display artist for Anthropologie, she fell in love with the art installations she’d create for the brand, and when she moved back home to New Zealand this year, decided to create a platform for herself to continue this creative work. The Dust Co was born.

A home and lifestyle brand, The Dust Co. aesthetic is inspired by travel, laidback living and sun chasing – and Zoe’s designed each piece to bring that slow, summer holiday feel into a space.

My favourites from the collection are The Dust Co’s huge stained glass sun-catchers. Zoe painstakingly chose the glass types and colours to a specific palette, inspired by a place she’s travelled to. (The Marrakech piece uses the pinks, greens and earthy tones that reference the colours of that city, and the Island piece is inspired by the sun, sea and sand tones of the Balearic Islands). They’re all handmade to order – over many many hours – by Zoe’s mum, who has been working with stained glass for over 30 years.

Also on my wishlist is one of the brass wall pieces. Inspired by motifs found in far-flung sun traps, they’re designed to add a sense of those golden holiday vibes to any room in which they’re placed and are hand polished and finished by Zoe herself. There’s also beautiful silk scarves to elevate your everyday  – all printed and made in New Zealand, too.

The Dust Co. online store  /   Instagram

23.08.2018

Gidon Bing at Good Form


Styling by Sara Black

 

Last year, our friends Mr Bigglesworthy – purveyors of the very best in authentic Mid-Century pieces  – launched a sister brand, Good Form. (Um, how great is that name though? Jealous I didn’t think of it tbh.)

Through Good Form, Emma and Dan are extending their curation to the contemporary, including furniture and lighting from some of the most iconic international brands – and now – collector’s pieces from closer to home, as they’ve just added NZ designer Gidon Bing to their portfolio of design visionaries. You all know Gidon Bing, right? A sculptor and ceramicist, Gidon developed his craft working with classically-trained master artisans in NZ, Europe, Israel and Asia, and while he works from a modest boatshed studio in Auckland, his work is respected globally – it’s been featured in Selfridges of London, Milan’s Salone del Mobile and other high-profile galleries.

To celebrate the arrival of the Gidon Bing collection at Good Form, Dan and Emma asked NZ stylist Sara Black to work her magic on a series of Still Life images.

Gidon also worked with Dan and Emma on the interior architecture of the Good Form space – pictured here.

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